First-Aid Station; Explosives Room



Concrete Brattice (with Manhole, Solid); Timber Door



Telephone; Power Line; Electric Light; Motor, Fan; Pump; Hoist; Gong



Shaft Stations



Conventions Used on Mine Maps (entire plate)



Mine Openings: Shafts (Rectangular, Circular); Tunnels; Diamond Drill Hole; Churn Drill Prospect Hole; Water Well; Oil Well; Gas Well; Sulphur Well, Barren Well; Mines & Quarries; Prospects



Conventions Used on Topographic Maps (entire plate)



Hypsography: Contours, Dumps, Dump and Car Track, Fills, Open Cuts, Cut, Stripping, Open Pits; Sand and Sand Dunes



Conventions Used on Topographic Maps (entire plate)



Limestone, Sand, Conglomerate, Drift, Metamorphic Rock, Gneiss



Geologic Conventions (entire plate)


Source: Lester C. Uren (1919) “Conventional Symbols for Mine Maps.” Mining and Scientific Press (August 16, 1919 p. 231-235)


It measures 69 feet long and 11 feet wide and required the services of nearly a dozen men to carry it…

Enormous map moving, ca. 1917.



The map shows that portion of the United States between the eastern boundary of Minnesota and the Pacific coast, and the entire Northern Pacific Railway system, including practically every station on the line.

Popular Mechanics, February 1917.


Catalonian Health Administration Areas (1936-39)



Foreign interests allied against the Spanish Republic (1937)



Aragon Front of the war: Republican gains shown as broken barbed wire, prisoners taken shown as silhouettes of men marching under guard, and captured armaments shown as images of specific weapons with numbers captured (1936).



The Way to Peace! Nine maps of German campaigns from August 1914 to spring 1918.



The Impact of Our Submarines: Reduction in shipping, south-east Britain, due to German Submarines (1917)


Imperial War Museum @ VADS

Spanish Civil War Poster Collection

Posters of Conflict Collection


Thanks to A London Salmagundi for original link

Chemical smoke puffs represent exploding shells…


Surveyed through field glasses that make it appear miles away, a novel war map at Princeton University makes artillery practice realistic to students of the Princeton unit of the Reserve Officers Training Corps.

…Each student takes his turn at directing the miniature “barrage.” The ingenious map is operated by the instructor, who follows the student’s data and commands to fire. A small adjoining map is criss-crossed with lines showing where shells with various ranges would strike. Over this key chart moves a lever which, placed at the spot where the student’s shot would fall, swings a glass nozzle to a corresponding position on the large map; at the student’s word “fire” a puff of artificial smoke is released.

Popular Mechanics, May 1927


“Plan shewing principle characters of work used in mapping.”

A map of nowhere showing everything.


Andre_192 copy_150

Without and with color.



Terrain symbols.



“Plan shewing proposed new street.”

Maps are propositions, right?



Trees and terrain.



Geological mapping.


George G. André

The Draughtsman’s Handbook of Plan and Map Drawing
Including Instructions for the Preparation of Engineering, Architectural, and Mechanical Drawings.

London, New York, E. & F. N. Spon, 1891

Entire book available from Google Books

Iowa is dignified by the largest egg of all…

Innovations in poultry maps, 1931…


An egg map of the United States, showing at a glance relative egg production of each state, ca. 1931.

Each state is represented by imitation eggs of different sizes.


Popular Mechanics, May 1931

Several signal officers flying alone or as passengers were able to make usable sketch maps of the country below them, as they flew two or three thousand feet in the air.


The practicability of making war maps from aeroplanes during aerial scouting expeditions into the enemy’s territory has recently been tested by the signal corps of the United States army and found entirely feasible. Several signal officers flying alone or as passengers were able to make usable sketch maps of the country below them, as they flew two or three thousand feet in the air. Two maps that were made during these tests are reproduced [above].

One of them is the rough sketch map drawn by Lieut. W.C. Sherman while riding as a passenger in an aeroplane with Lieut. Thomas DeWitt Milling on his record flight from Texas City to San Antonio. Tex., on March 28, 1913. It was drawn while they were traveling 56 miles an hour and, by means of the signal corps symbols, gives a clear picture of the country tover which they passed. Railroads, highways, streams. towns, woods. etc., are marked, and the figures on the lefthand margin indicate the aeroplane’s time. The original sketch is 12 ft. long and to scale, 6 1/2 inches equaling 10 minutes, and 1 in. equaling 1.44 mile. The other is a completed map drawn from a sketch of San Diego; Cal., and vicinity made by Lieut. J. D. Park while flying alone on May 3, 1913. a few days before his death in an aeroplane accident on May 9. The coast line and the topography of the country are indicated clearly enough to be of value to an attacking force, and at various points clear fields where airmen might make safe landings are marked out. Although the strip of country included in the map is 5 miles wide and 15 miles long, the entire sketch was made during a 35-minute flight from the aviation field at the south along the line of the railroad. At times the airman reached a height of over 3,000 ft. and from there was able to note the character of the country for 10 miles about.

Popular Mechanics Magazine, Volume 20, Number 4, October 1913.